Thomas M Pte 1715 4th Royal Sussex Regiment

Thomas M Pte 1715 4th Royal Sussex Regiment

THOMAS, MAURICE, Private, No. 1715, 1/4th (Service) Battn. the Royal Sussex Regt. (T.F.), s. of the late Thomas Henry Thomas, of Worthing, by his wife, Ellen (11, Stanhope Road, Worthing), dau. of William Knight, of Washington, Sussex; b. Worthing, co. Sussex, 4 April, 1897; educ. St. Andrew’s Higher Grade School there, and on leaving became a messenger boy at the Worthing G.P.O. and had passed his examinations for the staff when war broke out. He had joined the Royal Sussex Territorials, 14 Aug. 1913; was called up 4 Aug. 1914, and volunteered for foreign service, and left England for the Dardanelles in July, 1915. He was attd. to the machine- gun section of his battn., landed at Suvla Bay, 8 Aug. and was killed in action there four days later, 12 Aug. 1915, as his battn. was retiring after being relieved from the front trenches. The Turks opened a heavy machine-gun fire on them, and he was hit and killed almost immediately. He was buried where he fell at Anafarta Sagir, 1.20-000-105H, near Track to Chocolate Hill between 4-7 p.m. He was a prominent member of the Holy Trinity Church Lads’ Naval Brigade.

Source : De Ruvigny’s Roll Of Honour Vol 1

 

Groves L A Lt 11th Royal Sussex Regiment

Groves L A Lt 11th Royal Sussex Regiment

L IEUTENANT LEONARD ALLOWAY GROVES, Royal Sussex Regiment, was the son of Aubrey Groves of Ramsgate, and was born in 1878. He became a member of the Stock Exchange in 1904, trading under his own name.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Inns of Court O.T.C. and eventually received his commission in the 11th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment.

He went to France early in 1916 and was killed while leading his men to the attack on Beaumont Hamel on September 3rd. For a long time he was reported as missing, but it was finally ascertained that he was killed instantly.

Source : The Stock Exchange War Memorial 1914-1918

Strange A J W Pte 2190 5th Royal Sussex Regiment

Strange A J W Pte 2190 5th Royal Sussex Regiment

STRANGE, ARNOLD JOHN WARD, Private, No 2190, 5th (Cinque Ports) Battn. The Royal Sussex Regt. (T.F.), only s. of Charles James Strange, of Brackleigh, Crowborough, Sussex, retired Farmer, by his wife, Mary Jane, dau. of Thomas Ward; b. Silsworth Lodge, Crich, Rugby, 8 Sept. 1896; educ. King Charles’ School, Tunbridge Wells. On the outbreak of war joined the Sussex Territorials and signed on for foreign service, 14 Aug. 1914; went to France, 18 Feb. 1915, the battn. being held in reserve for the 2nd Sussex; selected as sniper for his platoon, 4 March, 1915; mortally wounded by a shell on Sunday, 17 Oct. 1915, and died the following day at Sailly-au-Bois; unm. Buried in the military cemetery at Louvercourt. His commanding officer spoke highly of him, describing him ” as most intelligent, a keen soldier, always ready to volunteer for everything, brave as a lion and a splendid shot.”

Source : De Ruvigny’s Roll Of Honour Vol 1

 

Crawley-Boevy E M Captain 1st Royal Sussex Regiment

Crawley-Boevy E M Captain 1st Royal Sussex Regiment

CAPTAIN E. M. CRAWLEY-BOEVEY

Ist BATTALION THE ROYAL SUSSEX REGIMENT

EDWARD MARTIN CRAWLEY-BOEVEY was the second son of Sir Thomas Crawley-Boevey, Bart., of Flaxley Abbey, Newnham, Gloucestershire. He entered the School in 1887, left in 1892, entered the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in 1894, was appointed Second Lieutenant in the Royal Sussex Regiment in 1895, promoted Lieutenant in 1897, and Captain in 1902.

He served in the South African War, taking part in the actions at Houtnek, Vet River, Zand River, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Diamond Hill, Wittenburg, and Ladybrand, was mentioned in Despatches, and received the Queen’s Medal with four Clasps, and the King’s Medal with two. As a Lieutenant he was sent with one hundred men from the Cape to represent the Regiment at King Edward’s Coronation. When the War broke out, he was at the Depôt at Chichester, after having served several years with the 1st Battalion in India.

He was a skilful company leader, a noted marksman, an excellent draughtsman, and was greatly esteemed by all ranks, especially by the men of his own Company. The complete confidence he inspired in his sub- ordinates may be shown by a sentence taken from a letter written by one of his junior brother Officers: “I can truly say, without any flattery, that I would have followed him to Hell.”

He was killed in the trenches, near Bailleul, on December 24th, 1914 being at the time attached to the 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, to which Regiment he had taken out a draft in November. Age 41.

He married, in 1905, Winifred, youngest daughter of Colonel Sartorius, C.B., of Thorwald, Godalming, Surrey, and left one son.